Resident engineer worried workers’ strike will slow completion of Pokuase interchange

The resident engineer for the four-tier Pokuase interchange in Accra, Kwabena Bempong is worried the timelines for the project may be further affected if workers do not call off their sit-down strike.

The project has already been delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.



According to him, managers of the project will soon reach an agreement with the striking workers.



The disgruntled workers yesterday [Thursday] laid down their tools to demand a 75 percent increment of their GHS20.20 daily wage.

They are also demanding better protection and complained of a lack of opportunities for health check-ups ahead of the completion of the project.

Contractors have said the project is over 80 percent complete.



In an interview with Citi News, Mr. Bempong said “every day that they don’t go to work is a day lost. We have a very tight schedule.”

The workers have complained about unfair treatment and being overworked, which the engineer acknowledged.

“This is also one of the challenges because we are working seven days a week. Certain times we are working in the night.”

Mr. Bempong, however, said the workers had agreed to the terms they are currently working under.

“The expectation is that they would be given commensurate payment but as I mentioned, the payment that they are receiving is in accordance with the collective bargaining agreement that they have signed to.”

Pokuase Interchange workers strike to demand better working conditions1

The Pokuase interchange project comprises a four-tier interchange at Pokuase, a five-kilometre Awoshie-Pokuase road, a two-kilometre Accra-Nsawam road, a two-kilometre Kwabenya road, and 10-kilometre local roads.

The $94 million Pokuase Interchange project is expected to ease traffic congestion, improve urban mobility, and benefit agro-industries located within the project zone.



The project is being undertaken by Zhongmei Engineering Group Limited, with Messrs Associated Consultants Limited (ACON) and the Bigen Group.

Source: citifmonline

Tagged:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.